Teaching Computer Science (CS) is one way to help students of all ages to learn more about systems thinking, creative problem solving, design, art and aesthetics, writing and storytelling, and other 21st century skills. This article includes 12 resources (curriculum guides, lesson plans, student activities and games, programming apps and tools) to help any K-12 teacher get started teaching computer science concepts and programming to their students.

K-12 Computer Science Curriculum and Resources

Below are resources to help get you started with teaching computer science to your students.
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Youtube.com/teachers a safe place for classroom videos

YouTube.com just announced their new YouTube.com/Teachers area designed specifically for teachers to use in schools and with students. According to an article on Mindshift.com:

The new teachers site is part one of two big initiatives on the part of YouTube geared towards educators. In the next couple of weeks, a bigger announcement will be made about huge changes that will address many of the concerns teachers have had about using YouTube videos (you know what they are). Stay tuned for more news in two weeks.

Getting Started

Under the Getting Started Tab on the front page of YouTube.com/Teachers you can find several areas that will help you as a teacher get started. Click to continue reading…

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Students make books that demonstrate their understanding of classroom procedures

During the 2008-2009 school year, I began using The Sisters’ (Gail Boushey and Joan Moser) process of teaching balanced literacy to my fourth grade students: Daily Five Reading and Literacy CAFE. Periodically I will post information, videos, or examples of how I am implementing this balanced literacy structure.

One the keys to success with Daily Five is helping students learn, understand, and practice the Daily Five procedures and routines quickly and efficiently. In my classroom I spend a lot of time having my students model the behavior I wanted. We also created together large anchor charts in the classroom that were posted on the classroom wall. Another way I had my students reinforce their knowledge of the Daily Five procedures and expectations was by having them make small, foldable books for homework.

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See how easy it is to use Google Calendar to schedule parent teacher conferences and classroom volunteers.

Last week I posted an article about how to use to two FREE web 2.0 services to create online sign-up forms for parent-teacher conferences, classroom volunteers, and so on.

Google recently updated their FREE calendar that is included with their Gmail (email) service. Using Google’s new “Appointment Slots” feature in their calendar allows you to create appointment slots that people can sign-up for. This would be great help for parent-teacher conferences as well.

Watch the video below to see how easy it is to set-up appointment slots. Click to continue reading…

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So many of the procedures we use to contact and make appointments with parents are inefficient and extremely time-consuming for both teachers and parents. One very helpful way to integrate technology into your classroom is by using technology to make more efficient use of your time. Even if your school is committed to staying in the 20th (or even 19th) century, doesn’t mean your classroom has to be. Use technology to make things easier, quicker, and more user-friendly for all.

Between photocopying, collecting, making more copies, collecting, checking-off, making more copies, collecting, checking-off, and organizing, sign-ups (for conferences, field-trips, volunteers, and so on) can be a real headache. Below are two free services, (designed with teachers in mind) to help ease your burden when it comes to sign-up forms. Click to continue reading…

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Read To Self: Great Books for Reluctant Readers

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During the 2008-2009 school year, I began using The Sisters’ (Gail Boushey and Joan Moser) process of teaching balanced literacy to my fourth grade students: Daily Five Reading and Literacy CAFE. Periodically I will post information, videos, or examples of how I am implementing this balanced literacy structure. Books for Reluctant and Struggling Readers When […]

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Technology Tools For Teachers

I’m always interested in learning about the tools and resources other educators are using. In the spirit of sharing, this post contains a selection of my favorite and most often used technology tools and resources. Computer What can I say, I am totally biased and I hate dealing with problems!

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Being a Healthy & Strong Educator

Being a teacher and having many friends that are teachers, I know we all struggle with a great deal of stress and have trouble finding time to take care of ourselves during the school year. Over this past year I have been using P90X: Tony Horton’s 90-Day Extreme Home Fitness Workout DVD Program and I […]

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Theater in the Classroom: Bad Wolf Press

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During the 2008-2009 school year I ended the school year with a musical play created by Bad Wolf Press. It was a terrific success on all accounts. The students and families loved it, students gained valuable performance skills and increased their reading fluency skills in the process. In the future, I would love to use […]

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Word Work: Salt Dough Spelling

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During the 2008-2009 school year, I began using The Sisters’ (Gail Boushey and Joan Moser) process of teaching balanced literacy to my fourth grade students: Daily Five Reading and Literacy CAFE. Periodically I will post information, videos, or examples of how I am implementing this balanced literacy structure. Word Work One of the five components […]

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